Vancouver Avian Research Centre

.....Research - Conservation - Education

April 20th, 2010

A very busy weekend at Colony Farm with the first big push of migrants coming through. The threat of rain on both days prevented us from opening all of our nets and forced us to close early on Saturday. Rain at dawn on Sunday delayed opening but activity in the banding area was high with many birds moving around the station and contact calls were coming from everywhere! We drank coffee and paced up and down in our new Banding Pagoda eagerly awaiting an opportunity to open some nets which we eventually did and were quickly inundated with birds with Yellow-rumped Warblers dominating the catch. It ended up being a picture perfect morning with lots of sunshine and birds and it was absolutely fabulous to be out there in the sunshine with the returning migrants.

Having just returned from a birding trip to Mexico late on Friday evening it really gave me yet another opportunity to marvel at the miracle of migration. Having sat on a plane for the 5 hour return flight at 500+ mph you really can only marvel at ‘our’ small neotropical migrants, some weighing maybe 6 grams or so making these incredible journeys back to BC and beyond!

New birds banded - 114:

  • Ruby-crowned Kinglet – 5

  • Yellow-rumped Warbler – 65 (Audubon’s – 49, Myrtle – 11, Unidentified – 5)

  • Lincoln’s Sparrow – 12

  • American Goldfinch – 7

  • Common Yellowthroat – 3

  • Dark-eyed Junco - 3

  • Savannah Sparrow – 2

  • Song Sparrow – 5

  • Fox Sparrow - 2

  • White-crowned Sparrow – 1

  • Hermit Thrush – 1

  • Red-winged Blackbird – 4

  • Spotted Towhee – 1

  • American Robin - 3

Retraps - 12:

  • American Robin – 3

  • American Goldfinch – 1

  • Dark-eyed Junco – 1

  • Spotted Towhee – 4

  • Fox Sparrow – 1

  • Common yellowthroat – 1

  • Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon’s) - 1

Happy spring banding & birding!

  

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